Northburn Primary School


Key Stage 1 Art and Design

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Year 1

  • Respond to ideas and starting points.
  • Explore ideas and collect visual information.
  • Explore different methods and materials as ideas develop.
  • Describe the work of notable artists, artisans and designers.
  • Use some of the ideas of artists studied to create pieces.
  • Use thick and thin brushes.
  • Name the primary colours
  • Add white to colours to make tints and black to colours to make tones.
  • Create a colour wheel to show primary and secondary colours.
  • Draw lines of different sizes and thickness.
  • Colour (own work) neatly following the lines.
  • Show pattern and texture by adding dots and lines.
  • Begin to show different tones by using coloured pencils.
  • Use a combination of materials that are cut, torn and glued.
  • Sort and arrange materials.
  • Mix materials to create texture.
  • Use a combination of shapes.
  • Include lines and texture.
  • Use rolled up paper, straws, paper, card and clay as materials.
  • Use techniques such as rolling, cutting, moulding and carving.
  • Use repeating or overlapping shapes.
  • Mimic print from the environment (e.g. wallpapers).
  • Use objects to create prints (e.g. fruit, vegetables or sponges).
  • Press, roll, rub and stamp to make prints
  • Use weaving to create a pattern.
  • Join materials using glue and/a stitch.
  • Use plaiting.
  • Use dip dye techniques.
  • Use a wide range of tools to create different textures, lines, tones, colours and shapes.

Year 2

  • Respond to ideas and starting points.
  • Explore ideas and collect visual information.
  • Explore different methods and materials as ideas develop.
  • Describe the work of notable artists, artisans and designers.
  • Use some of the ideas of artists studied to create pieces.
  • Paint using thick and thin brushes as appropriate.
  • Mix primary colours to make secondary.
  • Mix with increasing control tints and tones.
  • Create colour wheels that include ternary colours.
  • Draw using charcoal, pencils and pastels.
  • Draw using three different grades of pencil (4B, 8B, HB)
  • Show pattern and texture by using a range of different marks.
  • Create different tones using light and dark in their drawings.
  • Use a combination of materials that are cut, torn and glued.
  • Sort and arrange materials.
  • Mix materials to create texture.
  • Use a combination of shapes.
  • Include lines and texture.
  • Use rolled up paper, straws, paper, card and clay as materials.
  • Use techniques such as rolling, cutting, moulding and carving.
  • Use repeating or overlapping shapes.
  • Mimic print from the environment (e.g. wallpapers).
  • Use objects to create prints (e.g. fruit, vegetables or sponges).
  • Press, roll, rub and stamp to make prints
  • Use weaving to create a pattern.
  • Join materials using glue and/a stitch.
  • Use plaiting.
  • Use dip dye techniques.
  • Use a wide range of tools to create different textures, lines, tones, colours and shapes.

Key Stage 1 Computing

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Year 1

  • Programming:
    • Make a programmable device do what they want by inputting instructions.
      • Describe what actions they need to do to make something happen and begin to use the word algorithm.
      • Make predictions about what will happen for a short series of instructions.
      • Use software/apps to create movement and patterns on a screen.
      • Use the word debug to describe when a mistake is corrected.
      • Save information and retrieve it again.
  • Multimedia:
    • Use technology to create and present ideas.
      • Use a keyboard to enter text.
      • Save information and retrieve it again.
      • Be creative with different technology tools.
  • e-Safety
    • Talk about why it is important to be kind and polite.
      • Recognise an age appropriate website.
      • Agree and follow e-Safety rules.
      • Tell an adult when they see something unexpected or worrying online.
      • Describe what personal information is and the importance of keeping a password private
  • Handling Data:
    • Use technology to collect information, including photos, video and sound.
      • Add information to a pictograph.
      • Describe the different ways in which information can be shown.
  • Technology in our Lives
    • Recognise the ways we use technology in the classroom, home and community.
      • Use links to websites to find information.
      • Identify some of the benefits of using technology.

Year 2

  • Programming:
    • Give and follow instructions (using forward, backward and turn).
      • Order instructions to make something happen and talk about this as an algorithm.
      • Program a device or software to do a particular task.
      • Make logical predictions about what will happen on a program.
      • Watch a program execute and identify where it goes wrong, then debug the program.
  • Multimedia:
    • Use technology to organise and present ideas in different ways.
      • Use the keyboard to add, delete and space text for others to read.
      • Save and open files.
      • Share ideas with other people using an online tool.
  • e-Safety:
    • Explain the importance of keeping a password and personal information private.
      • Describe the things that can happen online that you must tell an adult about.
      • Talk about why it is important to be kind and polite online and in real life.
  • Handling Data:
    • Identify the different ways technology can be used to collect information (camera, microscope or sound recorder).
      • Make and save a chart or graph from data they have collected.
      • Use a branching database.
  • Technology in our Lives:
    • Explain why we use technology in the classroom, home and the community.
      • Identify the benefits of using technology including finding information, creating and communicating.
      • Recognise and talk about the differences between the internet and things in the physical world.

Key Stage 1 Design and Technology

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Cooking and Nutrition

Year 1
  • Cut, peel or grate ingredients safely and hygienically.
  • Measure or weigh using measuring cups or electronic scales.
  • Assemble or cook ingredients.
Year 2
  • Cut, peel or grate ingredients safely and hygienically.
  • Measure or weigh using measuring cups or electronic scales.
  • Assemble or cook ingredients.

Design

Year 1
  • Design products that have a clear purpose and an intended user.
  • Use software to design.
Year 2
  • Design products that have a clear purpose and an intended user.
  • Use software to design.

Evaluate

Year 1
  • Explore objects and designs to identify likes and dislikes of the designs.
  • Suggest improvements to existing designs.
  • Explore how products have been created.
Year 2
  • Explore objects and designs to identify likes and dislikes of the designs.
  • Suggest improvements to existing designs.
  • Explore how products have been created.

Make

Year 1
  • Make products, refining the design as work progresses.
Year 2
  • Make products, refining the design as work progresses.

Technical Knowledge

Year 1
  • Cut materials safely using tools provided.
  • Measure and mark out to the nearest centimetre.
  • Demonstrate a range of cutting and shaping techniques (such as tearing, cutting, folding and curling).
  • Demonstrate a range of joining techniques (such as gluing, using hinges or combining materials to strengthen).
  • Shape textiles using templates.
  • Join textiles using running stitch.
  • Colour and decorate textiles using a number of techniques (such as dyeing, adding sequins or printing).
  • Model designs using software.
  • Use materials to practise drilling, screwing, gluing and nailing materials to make and strengthen products.
  • Create products using levers, wheels and winding mechanisms.
Year 2
  • Cut materials safely using tools provided.
  • Measure and mark out to the nearest centimetre.
  • Demonstrate a range of cutting and shaping techniques (such as tearing, cutting, folding and curling).
  • Demonstrate a range of joining techniques (such as gluing, using hinges or combining materials to strengthen).
  • Shape textiles using templates.
  • Join textiles using running stitch
  • Colour and decorate textiles using a number of techniques (such as dyeing, adding sequins or printing).
  • Model designs using software.
  • Use materials to practise drilling, screwing, gluing and nailing materials to make and strengthen products.
  • Create products using levers, wheels and winding mechanisms.

Key Stage 1 English

English- Speaking and Listening

Spoken language

Year 1
  • Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers
  • Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge
  • Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary
  • Articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions
  • Give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings
  • Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating and responding to comments
  • Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas
  • Speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English
  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play/improvisations and debates
  • Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)
  • Consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the contributions of others
  • Select and use appropriate registers for effective communication
Year 2
  • Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers
  • Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge
  • Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary
  • Articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions
  • Give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings
  • Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating and responding to comments
  • Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas
  • Speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English
  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play/improvisations and debates
  • Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)
  • Consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the contributions of others
  • Select and use appropriate registers for effective communication

Key Stage 1 Geography

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Geographical skills and fieldwork

Year 1
  • Use aerial photographs to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features in their locality.
  • Use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds.
  • Draw or build an imaginary map; and use and basic symbols in a key.
Year 2
  • Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features in their locality.
  • Use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map
  • Use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and identify key human and physical features of its surrounding environment in their locality.
  • Draw a simple map: and use symbols in a key.
  • Use world maps atlases and globes to locate the United Kingdom and its countries as well as the world's continents and oceans.

Human and physical geography

Year 1
  • Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world.
  • Locate hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles
  • Begin to use vocabulary for key physical features including: beach cliff coast forest hill mountain sea ocean river soil season and weather
  • Begin to use vocabulary for human features including: city town village factory farm house office port harbour and shop.
Year 2
  • Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns around the world
  • Locate hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles
  • Use and explain key physical vocabulary including: beach cliff coast forest hill mountain sea ocean river soil valley vegetation season and weather
  • Use and explain vocabulary for human features including: city town village factory farm house office port harbour and shop.

Locational knowledge

Year 1
  • Name and locate the world’s 7 continents
  • Name and locate the 4 countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom
Year 2
  • Name and locate the world’s 7 continents and 5 oceans
  • Name, locate and identify characteristics of the 4 countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas

Place knowledge

Year 1
  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country.
Year 2
  • Explain geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country of their own choice.

Key Stage 1 History

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Year 1

  • Identify events beyond living memory that are significant nationally.
  • Identify changes within living memory using words and phrases related to time (old, new, a long time ago).
  • Use parts of stories and other sources to show an understanding and sequencing of the key of events.
  • Recount about the lives of significant individuals of the past who have contributed to national and international achievements; some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods.
  • Give some reasons why people in the past acted the way they did or why events happened.
  • Recount about significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.
  • Understand about some of the ways in which they find out about the past and identify different ways in which this is represented.
  • Ask and answer simple questions about the past from sources of information (eg. artefacts).
  • Identify some similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods.

Year 2

  • Study changes within living memory that reveal aspects of change in national life.
  • Know about events beyond living memory that are signicant nationally or globally.
  • Recognise the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements, some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods.
  • Know where people and events fit within a chronological order.
  • Explain changes within living memory, giving reasons for these changes using a wider range of time, related vocabulary, eg before, after, past, present
  • Recall significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.
  • Describe events beond living memory that are significant nationally.
  • Describe events beyond living memory that are significant globally.
  • Recount events in chronological order
  • Identify some reasons why people in the past acted the way they did and what events happened as a result.
  • Compare the lives of significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.
  • Understand some of the ways they find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented, knowing the difference between a reliable and unreliable source.
  • Choose and use parts of stories and other sources to ask and answer questions about the past.
  • Identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods and give simple explanations for these.

Key Stage 1 Mathematics

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Geometry - position and direction

Year 1
  • Describe position, direction and movement
  • Describe whole, half, quarter and three-quarter turns
Year 2
  • Order and arrange combinations of mathematical objects in patterns and sequences
  • Uses mathematical vocabulary to describe position, direction and movement, including movement in a straight line
  • Distinguishes between rotation as a turn and in terms of right angles for quarter, half and three-quarter turns (clockwise and anti-clockwise)

Geometry - properties of shapes

Year 1
  • Recognises and names common 2-D and 3-D shapes, including:
    • 2-D shapes e.g. rectangles (including squares), circles and triangles
    • 3-D shapes e.g. cuboids (including cubes), pyramids and spheres
Year 2
  • Identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes, including the number of sides
  • Identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes using line symmetry in a vertical line
  • Identify and describe the properties of 3-D shapes, including the number of edges, vertices and faces
  • Identify 2-D shapes on the surface of 3-D shapes, [for example, a circle on a cylinder and a triangle on a pyramid]
  • Compares and sorts common 2-D shapes
  • Compares and sorts common 3-D shapes
  • Compares and sorts everyday objects

Measurement

Year 1
  • Compare, describe and solve practical problems for:
    • Lengths and heights e.g. long/short, longer/shorter, tall/short, double/half
    • Mass/weight e.g. heavy/light, heavier than, lighter than
    • Capacity and volume e.g. full/empty, more than, less than, half, half full, quarter
    • Time e.g. quicker, slower, earlier, later
  • Measure and begin to record the following:
    • Lengths and heights
    • Mass/weight
    • Capacity and volume
    • Time (hours, minutes, seconds)
    • Recognise and know the value of different denominations of coins and notes
    • Sequence events in chronological order using language [for example, before and after, next, first, today, yesterday, tomorrow, morning, afternoon and evening]
  • Recognise and use language relating to dates, including days of the week, weeks, months and years
  • Tells the time to the hour and half past the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times
Year 2
  • Choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure length/height in any direction (m/cm);to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers
  • Choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure mass (kg/g); to the nearest appropriate unit, using scales
  • Choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure temperature (°c); to the nearest appropriate unit, using thermometers
  • Choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measurecapacity (litres/ml) to the nearest appropriate unit, using  measuring vessels
  • Compare and order lengths and record the results using >, < and =
  • Compare and order mass,  and record the results using >, < and =
  • Compare and order volume/capacity and record the results using >, < and =
  • Recognise and use symbols for pounds (£) and pence (p); combine amounts to make a particular value
  • Find different combinations of coins that equal the same amounts of money
  • Solves simple problems in a practical context involving addition of money of the same unit
  • Solves simple problems in a practical context involving subtraction of money of the same unit, including giving change
  • Compare and sequence intervals of time
  • Tell and write the time to five minutes, including quarter past/to the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times
  • Know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in a day

Number - addition and subtraction

Year 1
  • Read, write and interpret mathematical statements involving addition (+), subtraction (−) and equals (=) signs
  • Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20
  • Add  one-digit  numbers to 20, including 0
  • Add two-digit numbers to 20, including 0
  • Subtract one-digit numbers to 20, including 0
  • Subtract two-digit numbers to 20, including 0
  • Solve one-step problems that involve addition, using concrete objects and pictorial representations, and missing number problems
  • Solve one-step problems that involve subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations, and missing number problems such as 7 = ? − 9
Year 2
  • Solves problems with addition by:
    • Applying their increasing knowledge of mental and written methods
  • Solves problems with subtraction by:Recalling and using addition and subtraction facts to 20 and 100:
  • Add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including:
    • A two-digit number and 1s
    • A two-digit number and 10s
    • 2 two-digit numbers
    • Adding 3 one-digit numbers
  • Show that addition of 2 numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and subtraction of 1 number from another cannot
  • Recognise and use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction and use this to check calculations and solve missing number problems

Number - fractions

Year 1
  • Recognises, finds and names a half as one of two equal parts of an object, shape or quantity
  • Recognise, find and name a quarter as 1 of 4 equal parts of an object, shape or quantity
Year 2
  • Recognises, find, name and write fractions ⅓, ¼,2/4and ¾
  • Recognises, find, name and write fractions ⅓, ¼,2/4and ¾ of a shape
  • Recognises, find, name and write fractions ⅓, ¼,2/4and ¾ of a set of objects or quantity
  • Recognises, find, name and write fractions ⅓, ¼,2/4and ¾ of a length
  • Write simple fractions, for example of ½ of 6 = 3 and recognise the equivalence of2/4and ½

Number - multiplication and division

Year 1
  • Solve one-step problems involving multiplication, by calculating the answer using concrete objects, pictorial representations and arrays with the support of the teacher
  • Solve one-step problems involving division, by calculating the answer using concrete objects, pictorial representations and arrays with the support of the teacher
Year 2
  • Recalls and use multiplication facts for the two, five and 10 multiplication tables, including recognising odd and even numbers
  • Recalls and use  division facts for the two, five and 10 multiplication tables, including recognising odd and even numbers
  • Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (x),  and equals (=) signs
  • Calculate mathematical statements for division within the multiplication tables and write them using the  division (÷) and equals (=) signs
  • Show that multiplication of 2 numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of 1 number by another cannot
  • Solves problems involving multiplication using appropriate methods including, (using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods, and multiplication facts), including problems in contexts
  • Solves problems involving division using appropriate methods including, (using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods, and division facts), including problems in contexts

Number - number and place value

Year 1
  • Count to and across 100, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number
  • Count, read and write numbers to 100 in numerals
  • Count in multiples of twos, fives and tens
  • Given a number, identifies 1 more and 1 less
  • Identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial representations including the number line
  • Use the language of: equal to, more than, less than (fewer), most, least
  • Read numbers 1-20 in numerals
    • Read numbers 1-20 in words
      • Write numbers 1-20 in numerals
      • Write numbers 1-20 in words
Year 2
  • Count in steps of two, three, and five from 0, and in 10s from any number, forward and backward
  • Recognise the place value of each digit in a two-digit number (10s, 1s)
  • Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations, including the number line
  • Compares and orders numbers from 0 up to 100
  • Uses < > and = signs correctly
  • Read and write numbers to at least 100 in numerals and in words
  • Uses place value and number facts to solve problems

Statistics

Year 2
  • Interpret and construct simple pictograms
  • Interpret and construct simple tally charts
  • Interpret and construct simple block diagrams
  • Interpret and construct simple tables
  • Ask and answer simple questions by counting the number of objects in each category and sorting the categories by quantity
  • Asks and answers questions about totalling and comparing categorical data

Key Stage 1 Music

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Year 1

  • Sing: Sing as part of a group/ensemble/class maintaining pitch and timing.
    • Sing: Sing simple melodies showing an understanding of the lyrics by matching performance to the song.
  • Play and perform: Learn to treat instruments with respect and use the correct techniques for playing them (chime bars and untuned percussion).
    • Play and perform: Explore and create music using tuned and untuned instruments (chime bars and untuned percussion).
  • Listen and appraise: Begin to identify instruments when listening to music of different styles.
    • Listen and appraise: Identify the pulse in different musical styles and demonstrate through movement (e.g. clapping).
  • Improvise and compose: Understand that improvising is making up your own tune or rhythm and create your own using simple patterns.
    • Improvise and compose: Improvise with voice or instruments (using 1 note) and know that improvisations are not written down.
    • Improvise and compose: Explore composition using pictures and symbols to denote sounds.

Year 2

  • Sing: Know the importance of warming up, good posture, breathing in phrases and pronunciation when singing.
    • Sing: Sing in tune, melodies in a major key with a limited pitch range, performing with a good sense of pulse and rhythm
  • Play and perform: Play 'by ear' simple tunes or rhythms on a variety of instruments, individually and as part of a group.
    • Play and perform: Begin to recognise and demonstrate with instruments, the link between shape, symbols or musical notation and what is played.
  • Listen and appraise: Listen to a variety of music of different styles and begin to identify the style and where in the world it comes from.
    • Listen and appraise: Begin to use basic musical vocabulary to discuss music being listened to (pulse, rhythm, tempo and mood).
  • Improvise and compose: Improvise with voice or instruments (using 2 notes) and know that improvisations are not written down.
    • Improvise and compose: Create and compose simple melodies using 2 or 3 notes and record them using pictures or symbols. Know that once written down, this is a composition.
    • Improvise and compose: Create and compose simple rhythms using 1 and 2 beat notes and record them using pictures or symbols to denote crotchet and minims.

Key Stage 1 Physical Education

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Year 1

  • Multi-skills: Move using different pathways, stopping safely.
    • Multi-skills: Throw a ball underarm
      • Multi-skills: Catch a large ball with two hands
      • Multi-skills: Move to catch or collect a ball
      • Multi-skills: Kick a football using the correct part of the foot
      • Multi-skills: Hit a ball with a bat
      • Multi-skills: Roll a ball or hoop
      • Multi-skills: Follow simple rules
  • Dance: Copy basic dance actions demonstrated by the teacher
    • Dance: Put moves together to make a short dance
      • Dance: Begin to show rhythm
      • Dance: Use space safely, moving carefully with control
  • Gymnastics: Begin to show control when travelling and balancing
  • Gymnastics: Copy sequences and repeat them
    • Gymnastics: Balance on a large body part
      • Gymnastics: Perform basic gymnastic actions including rolling, stretching and curling, high and low
      • Gymnastics: Manage the space safely, showing good awareness of each other, mats and apparatus

Year 2

  • Multi-skills:Move fluently, changing direction and speed, avoiding collisions
    • Multi-skills: Throw and catch a large ball using an underarm throw with accuracy and control
      • Multi-skills: Throw and catch a tennis ball using an underarm throw with accuracy and control
      • Multi-skills: Kick a ball accurately to a partner and stop with control
      • Multi-skills: Hit a ball with a bat with accuracy and control
      • Multi-skills: Begin to develop simple tactics e.g. best position to be in during a game
  • Dance: Remember and repeat dance actions demonstrated by the teacher
    • Dance: Make a sequence by linking moves together
      • Dance: Change rhythm, speed, level and direction
      • Dance: Use space safely, moving with control and coordination
      • Dance: Choose moves to communicate a mood or feeling
  • Gymnastics: Use different combinations of floor, mat and apparatus, showing control, accuracy and fluency
    • Gymnastics: Plan and show a sequence of movements and adapt to include apparatus or a partner
      • Gymnastics: Balance on different points of the body
      • Gymnastics: Can show contrasts including small/tall, straight/curved, wide/narrow

Key Stage 1 Reading

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Comprehension

Year 1
  • Develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by:
    • Being encouraged to link what they read or hear to their own experiences
    • Becoming very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales
    • Recognising and joining in with predictable phrases
    • Learning to appreciate rhymes and poems, and to recite some by heart
    • Discussing word meanings, linking new meanings to those already known
  • Understands texts they can already read accurately and fluently.
    • Drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher
    • Checking that the text makes sense to them as they read
    • As they read, correcting inaccurate reading
    • Discussing the significance of the title and events
    • Making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done
    • Predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far
  • Participate in discussion about what is read to them, taking turns and listening to what others say
  • Explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them
Year 2
  • Develops pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by:
    • Discussing the sequence of events in texts and how items of information are related
    • Becoming increasingly familiar with a wider range of stories, fairy stories and traditional tales
    • Retelling a range of stories, fairy stories and traditional tales
    • Being introduced to non-fiction books that are structured in different ways
    • Recognising simple recurring literary language in stories and poetry
    • Discussing and clarifying the meanings of words, linking new meanings to known vocabulary
    • Discussing their favourite words and phrases
    • Continuing to build up a repertoire of poems learnt by heart, appreciating these and reciting some, with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear
  • Understand the texts that they can already read accurately and fluently and those that they listen to by:
    • Drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher
    • Checking that the text makes sense to them as they read, and correcting inaccurate reading
    • Making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done
    • Answering questions
    • Asking questions
    • Predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far
  • Participates in discussion about books, poems and other works that are read to them and those that they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say
  • Explain and discuss their understanding of books, poems and other material, both those that they listen to and those that they read for themselves

Word reading

Year 1
  • Apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words
  • Responds speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes
  • Read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing Grapheme/Phoneme correspondences that have been taught
  • Reads common exception words
  • Read words containing taught Grapheme/ Phoneme Correspondences and –s, –es, –ing, –ed, –er and –est endings
  • Read other words of more than one syllable that contain taught Grapheme/Phoneme Correspondences
  • Read words with contractions [for example, I'm, I'll, we’ll], and understand that the apostrophe represents the omitted letter(s)
  • Reads aloud accurately texts that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words
  • Reread these texts to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading
Year 2
  • Continue to apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words until automatic decoding has become embedded and reading is fluent
  • Reads accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes taught so far, especially recognising alternative sounds for graphemes
  • Reads accurately words of two or more syllables that contain the same graphemes as above
  • Read words containing common suffixes
  • Read further common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word
  • Read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered
  • Reads most words fluently and accurately without overt sounding and blending
  • Reads aloud texts closely matched to their improving phonic knowledge, sounding out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation
  • Re-reads these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading
    • Recognises audience and purpose in texts read

Key Stage 1 Religious Education

KS1 RE

Year 1

  • Know basic facts about the main world religions: which they are, where they worship eg: What is a Christian, Hindu?
  • Sort artefacts into religions
  • Know that all faiths worship a god or gods
  • Retell two different stories about Jesus and consider what they mean ie: Christmas and one other
  • Know about symbols of Hinduism and especially those related to light ie: How is fire used to celebrate Divali?
  • Know about symbols of Christianity especially those related to light ie: How the candle is used to represent Jesus,  (inc the Christingle)
  • Know that these are also symbolic to those not of these faiths eg: the white dove
  • Look for similarities between the ways religious people use common symbols such as : light, water, rock, trees
  • Discuss if it alright to have different views
  • Explains why some people choose to belong to religious groups.
  • Look for similarities between the ways religious people use common symbols such as : light, water, rock, trees
  • Compare creation stories of Christianity and Hinduism
  • Explain what ‘belonging’ means; shows understanding of what might happen if people do not feel they belong
  • How important is it to have animals and plants on our Earth?
  • How do you feel about the damage being done to our planet? (Why is important to look after the creatures of the world (Antarctic)?
  • What can we, as individuals do to help?
  • How do those of faith feel about this destruction?
  • Discuss what groups they belong to/ others belong to
  • Can explain why most people want to belong
  • Explains why some people, who are different, do not feel they belong
  • How can we live together when we are all so different?
  • Explains why it is important for people of different cultures and faiths to feel a sense of belonging
  • Can explore ‘Is it fair that some people belong and others do not? ‘ Explain what they believe and why.
  • Can explain what they would do to put this right.
  • Can research how other countries celebtate Christmas

Year 2

  • Compare basic facts about the main world religions: which they are, where they worship eg: What is a Christian, Hindu etc?
  • Knows that all faiths worship a God, or gods
  • Look for similarities between the ways religious people use common symbols such as: light, water, rock, trees
  • Begin to consider who or what ’ God’ is and why this is so important to believers
  • Retell two different stories about Jesus and consider what they mean Ie Christmas and one other
  • Explain why these are important to Christians
  • Know about symbols of Hinduism and especially those related to light ie: How is fire used to celebrate Divali?
  • Know about symbols of Christianity especially those related to light ie: How the candle is used to represent Jesus,  (inc the Christingle)
  • Know that these are also symbolic to those not of these faiths eg: the white dove
  • Look for similarities between the ways religious people use common symbols such as : light, water, rock, trees
  • Explain why these symbols are so important to Christians and Hindus
  • Discuss if it alright to have different views. What do we do if we don't agree?
  • Explain why some people chose to belong to religious groups and give a more developed respons
  • Look for similarities between the ways religious people use common symbols such as : light, water, rock, trees
  • Compare creation stories of Christianity and Hinduism,
  • How do you feel about the damage being done to our planet?  (Why is important to look after the creatures of the world (Antarctic)?
  • Explain what ‘belonging’ means Shows understanding of what might happen if people do not feel they belong and the impact thus might have on them
  • How important is it to have animals and plants on our Earth?
  • What can we, as individuals do to help?
  • How do those of faith feel about this destruction? Explain your ideas giving examples
  • Explains why most people want to belong
  • Explains why some people, who are different, do not feel they belong
  • How can we live together when we are all so different
  • Explain why it is important for people of different cultures and faiths to feel a sense of belonging and begin to make links to specific groups ie: Muslims, blacks, those who dress differently etc.
  • Correctly uses the terms ‘racism’ and ‘ prejudice’
  • Can explore ‘Is it fair that some people belong and others do not? ‘Explain what they believe and why.
  • Can explain what they would do to put this right.
  • Begin to understand the idea of religious tolerance- what it means for us and its link to British Values
  • Can research and share some facts about how other countries celebrate Christmas
  • Discuss what groups they belong to/others belong to and why it is important to them personally

Key Stage 1 Science

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Animals, including humans

Year 1
  • Identify and name a variety of common animals including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.
  • Identify and name a variety of common animals that are carnivores, herbivores and omnivores.
  • Describe and compare the structure of a variety of common animals (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals including pets).
  • Identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body.
  • Say which part of the body is associated with each sense.
  • Notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults.
  • Find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air).
  • Describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene.
Year 2
  • Notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults.
  • Find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air).
  • Describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene.
  • Identify and name a variety of common animals including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.
  • Identify and name a variety of common animals that are carnivores, herbivores and omnivores.
  • Describe and compare the structure of a variety of common animals (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals including pets).
  • Identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body.
  • Say which part of the body is associated with each sense.

Everyday materials

Year 1
  • Distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made.
  • Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water, and rock.
  • Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials.
  • Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.
Year 2
  • Distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made.
  • Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water, and rock.
  • Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials.
  • Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

Living things and their habitats

Year 1
  • Explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive.
  • Identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited.
  • Describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals.
  • Identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including micro-habitats.
  • Describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food.
Year 2
  • Explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive.
  • Identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited.
  • Describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals.
  • Describe how different animals and plants depend on each other.
  • Identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including micro-habitats.
  • Describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food.

Plants

Year 1
  • Identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees.
  • Identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees.
  • Observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants.
  • Find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy.
Year 2
  • Observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants.
  • Find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy.
  • Identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees.
  • Identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees.

Seasonal changes

Year 1
  • Observe changes across the 4 seasons.
  • Observe and describe weather associated with the seasons and how day length varies.
Year 2
  • Observe changes across the 4 seasons.
  • Observe and describe weather associated with the seasons and how day length varies.

Uses of everyday materials

Year 1
  • Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses.
  • Find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching.
Year 2
  • Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses.
  • Find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching.

Working scientifically

Year 1
  • Asking simple questions and recognising that they can be answered in different ways.
  • Observing closely, using simple equipment.
  • Performing simple tests.
  • Identifying and classifying animals.
  • Using their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions verbally.
  • Gathering and recording data to help in answering questions
Year 2
  • Asking simple questions and suggesting ways in which they can be answered.
  • Observing closely, using simple equipment and talking about what they have observed.
  • Performing simple tests, predicting what will happen.
  • Identifying and classifying animals and plants using simple features.
  • Using their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions, both verbally and written.
  • Gathering and recording data accurately to help in answering questions.

Key Stage 1 Writing

English- Speaking and Listening

Composition

Year 1
  • Discuss what they have written with the teacher or other pupils
  • Read their writing aloud, clearly enough to be heard by their peers and the teacher
  • Compose a sentence orally before writing it.
    • Sequence sentences to form short narratives
      • Re-read what they have written to check that it makes sense
    • Draft and write for a sustained period of 20 minutes (including cross curricular lesson time.)
Year 2
  • Develops positive attitudes towards, and stamina for, writing, by writing for different purposes
    • Plan, using both oral and written formats what they are going to write about.
  • Edit to check and improve their writing by making simple additions, revisions and corrections.
    • Evaluating their writing with the teacher and other pupils
      • Re-read to check that verbs to indicate time are used correctly and consistently including verbs in the continuous form.
    • Proofreading to check for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation
    • Segmenting spoken words into phonemes and representing these by graphemes, spelling many correctly in writtenwork.
    • Learning new ways of spelling phonemes for which one or more spellings are already known; and learn some words with each spelling, including a few common homophones in writtenwork
  • Read aloud what they have written with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear
    • Write narratives about personal experiences and those of others ( real and fictional)
      • Write about real events - a recount, a report, an explanation, a letter
      • Write poetry
      • Draft and write for a sustained period of at least 30 minutes. (Including cross curricular time)

Handwriting

Year 1
  • Sit correctly at a table, holding a pencil comfortably and correctly
  • Begins to form lower-case letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in the right place
  • Form capital letters
  • Understand which letters belong to which handwriting ‘families’ (ie letters that are formed in similar ways) and to practise these
  • Begin to use diagonal and horizontal strokes to join letters more consistently
Year 2
  • Form lower-case letters of the correct size relative to one another
  • Begin to use diagonal and horizontal strokes to join letters regularly and consistently
  • Writes capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower-case letters
  • Use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters

Transcription - Spelling

Year 1
  • Words containing each of the 40+ phonemes already taught
    • Spell some common exception words
      • The days of the week
    • Use letter names to distinguish between alternative spellings of the same sound.
    • Use the spelling rule for adding -s or -es as the plural marker for nouns and the third person singular for verbs
      • Use the prefix un- to change the meaning of verbs and adjectives.
      • Use-ing, -ed, -er and -est where no change is needed in the spelling of root words accurately in written work
  • Writes from memory simple sentences dictated by the teacher that include words using the grapheme/phoneme correspondences and common exception words taught so far
Year 2
  • Add suffixes to spell longer words including –ment, –ness, –ful, –less, –ly
  • Write from memory simple sentences dictated by the teacher that include words using the grapheme/ phoneme correspondences, common exception words and punctuation taught so far
    • Distinguish between homophones and near - homophones
      • Learn the possessive apostrophe ( singular) for example the girl's book
      • Learn to spell an increasing number of words with contracted forms
      • Learn to spell common exception words
      • Learning new ways of spelling phonemes for which 1 or more spellings are already known and learn some words with each spelling including a few common homophones
      • Segment spoken words into phonemes and represent these with graphemes spelling many correctly

Vocabulary, grammar and punctuation

Year 1
  • Begin to punctuate sentences using a capital letter and a full stop.
    • Use a capital letter for names of people, places, the days of the week, and the personal pronoun ‘I’
      • Introduce question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences.
      • Leave spaces between words
      • Join words and joining clauses using 'and'
Year 2
  • Uses capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences including exclamation sentences
  • Use commas to separate items in a list
    • Use sentences in different forms: statement, question, exclamation, command
      • Use expanded noun phrases to describe and specify.
      • Use apostrophes accurately (for contracted forms and the possessive singular.)
  • Use the correct form of verbs in past ,present  and progressive tense
  • Construct subordination (using when, if, that, because)
    • Construct co-ordination (using or, and, but)
      • Use the suffixes -ness, -er
  • Use the suffixes –er, –est in adjectives
    • Form adjectives using suffixes -ful, -less
    • Turn adjectives into  adverbs using -ly
      • Show awareness of audience and purpose in written tasks including cross curricular writing

Key Stage 2 Art and Design

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Year 3

  • Develop ideas from starting points throughout the curriculum.
  • Collect information, sketches and resources.
  • Adapt and refine ideas as they progress.
  • Explore ideas in a variety of ways.
  • Comment on artwork using visual language.
  • Replicate some of the techniques used by notable artists, artisans and designers.
  • Create original pieces that are influenced by studies of others.
  • Experiment with a range of mark making materials to create tools for painting.
  • Mix colours effectively.
  • Experiment using natural materials to extract pigment for mark making.
  • Experiment with creating mood with colour.
  • Use different harnesses of pencils to show line, tone and texture.
  • Annotate sketches to explain and elaborate ideas.
  • Sketch lightly (no need to use a rubber to correct mistakes).
  • Use shading to show light and shadow.
  • Use pencil hatching and cross hatching to show tone and texture.
  • Select and arrange materials for a striking effect.
  • Ensure work is precise.
  • Use coiling, overlapping, tessellation, mosaic and montage.
  • Create and combine shapes to create recognisable forms (e.g. shapes made from nets or solid materials).
  • Include texture that conveys feelings, expression or movement.
  • Use clay and other mouldable materials.
  • Add materials to provide interesting detail.
  • Use layers of two or more colours.
  • Replicate patterns observed in natural or built environments.
  • Make printing blocks (e.g. from coiled string glued to a block).
  • Make precise repeating patterns.
  • Shape and stitch materials.
  • Use basic cross stitch and back stitch.
  • Colour fabric.
  • Create weavings.
  • Quilt, pad and gather fabric.
  • Create images, video and sound recordings and explain why they were created.

Year 4

  • Develop ideas from starting points throughout the curriculum.
  • Collect information, sketches and resources.
  • Adapt and refine ideas as they progress.
  • Explore ideas in a variety of ways.
  • Comment on artwork using visual language.
  • Replicate some of the techniques used by notable artists, artisans and designers.
  • Create original pieces that are influenced by studies of others.
  • Use colour effectively to create mood within a painting.
  • Use a number of brush techniques using thick and thin brushes to produce shapes, textures, patterns and lines.
  • Mix colours effectively.
  • Use watercolour paint to produce washes for backgrounds then add detail.
  • Experiment with pen and ink .
  • Annotate sketches to explain and elaborate ideas.
  • Sketch lightly (no need to use a rubber to correct mistakes).
  • Experiment with pen, ink and water to show light and shadow.
  • Use pen and ink hatching and cross hatching to show tone and texture.
  • Select and arrange materials for a striking effect.
  • Ensure work is precise
  • Use coiling, overlapping, tessellation, mosaic and montage.
  • Create and combine shapes to create recognisable forms (e.g. shapes made from nets or solid materials).
  • Include texture that conveys feelings, expression or movement.
  • Use clay and other mouldable materials.
  • Add materials to provide interesting detail.
  • Use layers of two or more colours.
  • Replicate patterns observed in natural or built environments.
  • Make printing blocks (e.g. from coiled string glued to a block).
  • Make precise repeating patterns.
  • Shape and stitch materials.
  • Use basic cross stitch and back stitch.
  • Colour fabric.
  • Create weavings.
  • Quilt, pad and gather fabric.
  • Create images, video and sound recordings and explain why they were created.

Year 5

  • Develop and imaginatively extend ideas from starting points throughout the curriculum.
  • Collect information, sketches and resources and present ideas imaginatively in a sketch book.
  • Use the qualities of materials to enhance ideas.
  • Spot the potential in unexpected results as work progresses.
  • Comment on artwork with a fluent grasp of visual language.
  • Give detail (including own sketches) about the style of some notable artists, artisans and designers.
  • Show how the work of those studied was influential in both society and to other artists.
  • Create original pieces that show a range of influences and styles.
  • Sketch (lightly) before painting to combine line and colour.
  • Create a colour palette based upon skin tones.
  • Use the qualities of watercolour paints to create visually interesting pieces.
  • Use a single colour and it’s tones and tints to enhance the mood of a piece.
  • Use brush techniques and the qualities of paint to create texture.
  • Develop a personal style of painting, drawing upon ideas from other artists.
  • Use a variety of techniques to add shadows or show reflections.
  • Use a choice of techniques to depict human movement.
  • Choose a style of drawing suitable for the work that is realistic.
  • Mix textures (rough and smooth, plain and patterned).
  • Combine visual and tactile qualities.
  • Use ceramic mosaic materials and techniques.
  • Show life-like qualities and real-life proportions or, if more abstract, provoke different interpretations.
  • Use tools to carve and add shapes, texture and pattern.
  • Combine visual and tactile qualities.
  • Use frameworks (such as wire or moulds) to provide stability and form.
  • Build up layers of colours.
  • Create an accurate pattern, showing fine detail.
  • Use a range of visual elements to reflect the purpose of the work.
  • Show precision in techniques.
  • Choose from a range of stitching techniques.
  • Combine previously learned techniques to create pieces.
  • Enhance digital media by editing (including sound, video, animation, still images and installations).

Year 6

  • Develop and imaginatively extend ideas from starting points throughout the curriculum.
  • Collect information, sketches and resources and present ideas imaginatively in a sketch book.
  • Use the qualities of materials to enhance ideas.
  • Spot the potential in unexpected results as work progresses.
  • Comment on artwork with a fluent grasp of visual language.
  • Give detail (including own sketches) about the style of some notable artists, artisans and designers.
  • Show how the work of those studied was influential in both society and to other artists.
  • Create original pieces that show a range of influences and styles.
  • Sketch (lightly) before painting to combine line, pattern, texture and colour.
  • Create a colour palette based upon colours observed in the natural or built world.
  • Use the qualities of acrylic paints to create visually interesting pieces.
  • Combine colours, tones and tints to enhance the mood of a piece.
  • Use brush techniques and the qualities of paint to create a landscape painting.
  • Develop a personal style of painting, drawing upon ideas from other artists.
  • Use a variety of techniques to show perspective.
  • Use a choice of techniques to depict animal movement.
  • Choose a style of drawing suitable for the work that is impressionistic.
  • Mix textures (rough and smooth, plain and patterned).
  • Combine visual and tactile qualities.
  • Use ceramic mosaic materials and techniques.
  • Show life-like qualities and real-life proportions or, if more abstract, provoke different interpretations.
  • Use tools to carve and add shapes, texture and pattern.
  • Combine visual and tactile qualities.
  • Use frameworks (such as wire or moulds) to provide stability and form.
  • Build up layers of colours.
  • Create an accurate pattern, showing fine detail.
  • Use a range of visual elements to reflect the purpose of the work.
  • Show precision in techniques.
  • Choose from a range of stitching techniques.
  • Combine previously learned techniques to create pieces.
  • Enhance digital media by editing (including sound, video, animation, still images and installations).

Key Stage 2 Computing

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Year 3

  • Programming:
    • Break open ended problems up into smaller parts.
      • Put programming commands into a sequence to achieve a specific outcome.
      • Keep testing a programme and recognise when it needs to be debugged.
      • Use repeat commands.
      • Describe what algorithm they need for a simple task.
      • Detect a problem in an algorithm which could result in unsuccessful programming.
  • Multimedia:
    • Create effects with different technology tools.
    • Combine a mixture of text, graphics and sound to share ideas and learning.
      • Use appropriate keyboard commands to annotate text including making use of a spellchecker.
      • Evaluate work and its effectiveness.
      • Use appropriate tools to share work online.
  • e-Safety:
    • Create a secure password and discuss why this is important.
      • Protect personal information when online.
      • Use the safety features of websites as well as reporting concerns to an adult.
      • Recognise websites and games appropriate for their age.
      • Post positive comments online.
  • Handling Data:
    • Talk about the different ways data can be organised.
      • Search a ready-made database to answer questions.
      • Add to a database.
      • Make a branching database.
      • Use a data logger to monitor changes and talk about the information it collects.
  • Technology in our Lives:
    • Save and retrieve work on the internet, school network and own device.
      • Talk about the parts of a computer.
      • Understand and describe the World Wide Web as part of the Internet that contains websites and how we can communicate with others online.
      • Use search tools to find and use an appropriate website.

Year 4

  • Programming:
    • Use an efficient procedure to simplify a program.
      • Use a sensor to detect a change which can select an action within a program.
      • Use logical thinking to solve an open-ended problem by breaking it into smaller parts.
      • Test a program while they are putting it together.
      • Use a variety of tools to create a program.
      • Recognise an error in a program and debug it.
      • Recognise that an algorithm will help them sequence more complex programs.
  • Multimedia:
    • Use photos, video and sound to create an atmosphere when presenting to different audiences.
      • Change the appearance of text to increase its effectiveness.
      • Create, modify and present documents for a particular purpose.
      • Use a keyboard confidently and make use of a spellchecker to write and review work.
      • Use an appropriate took to share work and collaborate online.
  • e-Safety:
    • Choose a secure password when using a website.
      • Protect themselves from harm online.
      • Use the safety features of websites as well as reporting concerns to an adult.
      • Recognise websites and games appropriate for their age.
      • Comment positively and respectfully online.
  • Handling Data:
    • Organise data in different ways.
      • Collect data and identify where it could be inaccurate.
      • Plan, create and search a database to answer questions.
      • Use a data logger to record and share readings with others.
  • Technology in our Lives:
    • Think about the reliability of information found on the Internet.
      • How to check who own photos, text and clipart.
      • Create a hyperlink to a resource on the Internet.

Year 5

  • Programming:
    • Decompose a program into smaller parts to design an algorithm for a specific outcome and use this to write a program for a device or onscreen activity.
    • Use variable to increase programming possibilities.
      • Change an input to a program to achieve a different output.
      • Use ‘if’ and ‘when’ commands to select an action.
      • Refine a procedure using repeat commands to improve a program.
      • Use logical reasoning to detect and debug mistakes in a program.
      • Use logical thinking, imagination and creativity to extend a program.
  • Multimedia:
    • Use text, photo, sound and video editing tools to refine work.
      • Use the skills they have already developed to create content using unfamiliar technology.
      • Select, use and combine the appropriate technology tools to create effects that will have an impact on others.
      • Select an appropriate online or offline tool to create and share ideas.
      • Review and improve own work.
  • e-Safety:
    • Protect their password and other personal information.
      • Explain how to protect themselves online and the best ways to do this, including reporting concerns to an adult.
      • Communicate kindly and respectfully online and show an awareness that anything posted online can be seen, used and may affect others.
      • Protect a computer or device from harm
  • Handling Data:
    • Use a spreadsheet and database to collect and record data.
      • Choose an appropriate tool to help collect data.
      • Present data in an appropriate way.
      • Search a database using different operators to refine a search.
      • Talk about mistakes in data and suggest how it could be checked.
  • Technology in our Lives:
    • Describe the different parts of the internet.
      • Use different online communication tools for different purposes.
      • Use a search engine to find appropriate information and check its reliability.
      • Describe the different parts of a webpage.
      • Find out who the information on a website belongs to.
      • Describe the ways in which websites advertise their products.

Year 6

  • Programming:
    • Deconstruct a problem into smaller steps, recognising similarities to solutions used before.
      • Explain and program each of the steps in an algorithm (for a device or onscreen activity).
      • Evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of an algorithm while testing the programming of that algorithm.
      • Recognise when a variable is needed to achieve a required output.
      • Use a variable and operators to stop a program.
      • Use different inputs (including sensors) to control a device or onscreen action and predict what will happen.
      • Link errors in a program to a problem in the algorithm on which it is based.
  • Multimedia:
    • Talk about audience, atmosphere and structure when planning a particular outcome.
      • Identify the potential of unfamiliar technology to increase creativity.
      • Combine a range of media, recognising the contribution of each to achieve a particular outcome.
      • Be digitally discerning when evaluating the effectiveness of my own work and the work of others.
  • e-Safety:
    • Protect their password and other personal information.
      • Make good choices online including protecting themselves and others and recognising the consequences of sharing too much information about themselves online.
      • Protect a computer or device from harm.
  • Handling Data:
    • Select the most effective tool to collect data for an investigation.
      • Check the data for accuracy and plausibility.
      • Interpret the data collected.
      • Present the data in an appropriate way.
      • Interrogate a database.
  • Technology in our Lives:
    • Identify the different internet service to use for different purposes.
      • Describe how information is transported on the Internet.
      • Select an appropriate tool to communicate and collaborate online.
      • Talk about the way search results are selected and ranked.
      • Acknowledge the sources of information found online and adhere to copyright rules.
      • Talk about how websites can use data to make money and target their advertising.

Key Stage 2 Design and Technology

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Cooking and Nutrition

Year 3
  • Prepare ingredients hygienically using appropriate utensils.
  • Measure ingredients to the nearest gram accurately.
  • Follow a recipe.
  • Assemble or cook ingredients (controlling the temperature of the oven or hob, if cooking).
Year 4
  • Prepare ingredients hygienically using appropriate utensils.
  • Measure ingredients to the nearest gram accurately.
  • Follow a recipe.
  • Assemble or cook ingredients (controlling the temperature of the oven or hob, if cooking)
Year 5
  • Understand the importance of correct storage and handling of ingredients (using knowledge of micro-organisms).
  • Measure accurately and calculate ratios of ingredients to scale up or down from a recipe.
  • Demonstrate a range of baking and cooking techniques.
  • Create and refine recipes, including ingredients, methods, cooking times and temperatures.
Year 6
  • Understand the importance of correct storage and handling of ingredients (using knowledge of micro-organisms).
  • Measure accurately and calculate ratios of ingredients to scale up or down from a recipe.
  • Demonstrate a range of baking and cooking techniques.
  • Create and refine recipes, including ingredients, methods, cooking times and temperatures.

Design

Year 3
  • Make products by working efficiently (such as by carefully selecting materials).
Year 4
  • Make products by working efficiently (such as by carefully selecting materials).
Year 5
  • Design with the user in mind, motivated by the service a product will offer (rather than simply for profit).
  • Ensure products have a high-quality finish, using art skills where appropriate.
  • Use prototypes, cross-sectional diagrams and computer-aided designs to represent designs.
  • Combine elements of design from a range of inspirational designers throughout history, giving reasons for choices.
  • Create innovative designs that improve upon existing products.
Year 6
  • Design with the user in mind, motivated by the service a product will offer (rather than simply for profit).
  • Ensure products have a high-quality finish, using art skills where appropriate.
  • Use prototypes, cross-sectional diagrams and computer-aided designs to represent designs.
  • Combine elements of design from a range of inspirational designers throughout history, giving reasons for choices.
  • Create innovative designs that improve upon existing products.

Evaluate

Year 3
  • Refine work and techniques as work progresses, continually evaluating the products design.
  • Improve upon existing designs, giving reasons for choices.
  • Disassemble products to understand how they work.
Year 4
  • Refine work and techniques as work progresses, continually evaluating the products design.
  • Improve upon existing designs, giving reasons for choices.
  • Disassemble products to understand how they work
Year 5
  • Evaluate the design of products so as to suggest improvements to the user experiences
Year 6
  • Evaluate the design of products so as to suggest improvements to the user experiences

Make

Year 3
  • Make products by working efficiently (such as by carefully selecting materials).
Year 4
  • Make products by working efficiently (such as by carefully selecting materials).
Year 5
  • Make products through stages of prototypes, making continual refinements.
Year 6
  • Make products through stages of prototypes, making continual refinements.

Technical Knowledge

Year 3
  • Cut materials accurately and safely by selecting appropriate tools.
  • Measure and mark out to the nearest millimetre.
  • Apply appropriate cutting and shaping techniques that include cuts within the perimeter of the material (such as slots or cut-outs).
  • Select appropriate joining techniques.
  • Understand the need for a seam allowance.
  • Join textiles with appropriate stitching.
  • Select the most appropriate techniques to decorate textiles.
  • Create series and parallel circuits.
  • Control and monitor models using software designed for this purpose.
  • Choose suitable techniques to construct products or to repair items.
  • Strengthen materials using suitable techniques.
  • Use scientific knowledge of the transference of forces to choose appropriate mechanisms for a product (such as levers, winding mechanisms, pulleys and gears).
Year 4
  • Cut materials accurately and safely by selecting appropriate tools.
  • Measure and mark out to the nearest millimetre.
  • Apply appropriate cutting and shaping techniques that include cuts within the perimeter of the material (such as slots or cut-outs).
  • Select appropriate joining techniques.
  • Understand the need for a seam allowance.
  • Join textiles with appropriate stitching.
  • Select the most appropriate techniques to decorate textiles.
  • Create series and parallel circuits.
  • Control and monitor models using software designed for this purpose.
  • Choose suitable techniques to construct products or to repair items.
  • Strengthen materials using suitable techniques.
  • Use scientific knowledge of the transference of forces to choose appropriate mechanisms for a product (such as levers, winding mechanisms, pulleys and gears).
Year 5
  • Cut materials with precision and refine the finish with appropriate tools (such as sanding wood after cutting or a more precise scissor cut after roughly cutting out a shape).
  • Show an understanding of the qualities of materials to choose appropriate tools to cut and shape (such as the nature of fabric may require sharper scissors than would be used to cut paper).
  • Create objects (such as a cushion) that employ a seam allowance.
  • Join textiles with a combination of stitching techniques (such as back stitch for seams and running stitch to attach decoration).
  • Use the qualities of materials to create suitable visual and tactile effects in the decoration of textiles (such as soft decoration for comfort on a cushion).
  • Create circuits using electronics kits that employ a number of components (such as LEDs, resistors, transistors and chips).
  • Write code to control and monitor models or products.
  • Develop range of practical skills to create products (such as cutting, drilling and screwing, nailing, gluing, filing and sanding).
  • Convert rotary motion to linear using cams.
  • Use innovative combinations of electronics (or computing) and mechanics in product design
Year 6
  • Cut materials with precision and refine the finish with appropriate tools (such as sanding wood after cutting or a more precise scissor cut after roughly cutting out a shape).
  • Show an understanding of the qualities of materials to choose appropriate tools to cut and shape (such as the nature of fabric may require sharper scissors than would be used to cut paper).
  • Create objects (such as a cushion) that employ a seam allowance.
  • Join textiles with a combination of stitching techniques (such as back stitch for seams and running stitch to attach decoration).
  • Use the qualities of materials to create suitable visual and tactile effects in the decoration of textiles (such as soft decoration for comfort on a cushion).
  • Create circuits using electronics kits that employ a number of components (such as LEDs, resistors, transistors and chips).
  • Write code to control and monitor models or products.
  • Develop range of practical skills to create products (such as cutting, drilling and screwing, nailing, gluing, filing and sanding).
  • Convert rotary motion to linear using cams.
  • Use innovative combinations of electronics (or computing) and mechanics in product designs.

Key Stage 2 English

English- Speaking and Listening

Spoken language

Year 3
  • Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers
  • Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge
  • Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary
  • Articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions
  • Give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings
  • Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating and responding to comments
  • Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas
  • Speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English
  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play/improvisations and debates
  • Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)
  • Consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the contributions of others
  • Select and use appropriate registers for effective communication
Year 4
  • Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers
  • Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge
  • Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary
  • Articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions
  • Give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings
  • Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating and responding to comments
  • Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas
  • Speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English
  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play/improvisations and debates
  • Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)
  • Consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the contributions of others
  • Select and use appropriate registers for effective communication
Year 5
  • Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers
  • Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge
  • Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary
  • Articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions
  • Give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings
  • Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating and responding to comments
  • Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas
  • Speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English
  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play/improvisations and debates
  • Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)
  • Consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the contributions of others
  • Select and use appropriate registers for effective communication
Year 6
  • Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers
  • Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge
  • Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary
  • Articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions
  • Give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings
  • Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating and responding to comments
  • Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas
  • Speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English
  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play/improvisations and debates
  • Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)
  • Consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the contributions of others
  • Select and use appropriate registers for effective communication

Key Stage 2 Geography

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Geographical skills and fieldwork

Year 3
  • Use maps, atlases and globes to locate countries in Europe and the UK.
  • Use the four points of the compass to build their knowledge of the wider world.
  • Use four-figure grid references to locate places on a simplified map.
  • Use symbols and keys to understand simple maps and know why a key is needed.
  • Use the term physical geography, identifying them in pictures and on maps.
  • Use the term human features, identifying them in pictures and on maps.
Year 4
  • Use maps, atlases and globes to locate countries and describe features studied.
  • Use eight points of a compass to locate places in the United Kingdom.
  • Use six-figure grid references to locate places on a large scale OS map.
  • Use symbols and keys to identify features on an OS map, recognising and explaining why a key is important.
  • Use fieldwork to draw simple sketch maps of human and physical features in a local area.
Year 5
  • Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied
  • Use the eight points of a compass to build their knowledge of the UK and the wider world.
  • Use four and six-figure grid references, symbols and a key to locate features on a OS map.
  • Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.
Year 6
  • Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied
  • Use compasses and grid references to follow a short route on an OS map.
  • Use aerial photographs to identify and describe the features shown on an OS map.
  • Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Human and physical geography

Year 3
  • Identify key aspects of physical geography, including: rivers, and mountains.
  • Identify key aspects of human geography, including: cities and the distribution of natural resources including water.
Year 4
  • Physical geography: simply describe physical features including mountains, volcanoes, rivers and earthquakes.
  • Human geography: simply describe human geography features including main cities and land use.
Year 5
  • Human geography: Describe aspects of land use including settlements.
  • Physical geography: Describe climate zones.
  • Physical geography: Describe biomes and vegetation belts.
  • Physical geography: Describe rivers and mountains.
  • Physical geography: Describe and explain volcano types and reasons for earthquakes.
  • Physical geography: Describe and explain the water cycle.
Year 6
  • Physical geography: confidently identify significant environments.
  • Physical geography: compare and contrast different mountain and river regions.
  • Physical geography: compare different climate and biomes zones
  • Physical geography: recognise and describe the impact of volcanoes and earthquakes.
  • Human geography: confidently identify significant places around the world.
  • Human geography: compare and contrast settlements and land use of countries.
  • Human geography: compare and contrast the distribution of natural resources of countries.

Locational knowledge

Year 3
  • Locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) concentrating key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.
  • Locate countries and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including mountains, coasts and rivers).
  • Identify the position of  the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle.
Year 4
  • Locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe and South America, concentrating on key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.
  • Identify the position and significance of the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle.
  • Identify human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers) of the United Kingdom and a country in Europe.
Year 5
  • Locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.
  • Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.
  • Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)
Year 6
  • Locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.
  • Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.
  • Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night).

Place knowledge

Year 3
  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom and a European country.
Year 4
  • Begin to identify geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a European country, or a region within South America.
Year 5
  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America
Year 6
  • Understand and explain geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America

Key Stage 2 History

National Curriculum England 2014 - NAHT Assessment Framework

Year 3

  • Place the time studied on a time line.
  • Sequence several events within the time period.
  • Use dates and historical terms related to the study time period.
  • Find out about the everyday lives of people in the time considered.
  • Identify and give reasons for different ways in which the past is represented.
  • Distinguish between different sources by comparing different versions of the same event.
  • Use a range of sources to find out about a period.
  • Compare the time period with our life today.
  • Identify reasons for and results of people's actions
  • Understand why people may have wanted to do something.
  • Select, retrieve and record information relevant to the time period.

Year 4

  • Place events from the period studied on a time line.
  • Use terms related to the period and begin to date events.
  • Understand more complex historical terms eg. BC/AD
  • Use evidence to reconstruct life in the time studied.
  • Identify key features and events of time studied.
  • Use evidence to build up a picture of a past event.
  • Begin to recognise links and effects in the time studied.
  • Begin to offer reasonable explanations for some events.
  • Begin to evaluate the usefulness of different sources.
  • Choose relevant material to present a view of one aspect of life in a past time.
  • Recall, select and organise historical information to ask and answer questions about the past.

Year 5

  • Know and sequence key events in the time studied.
  • Use relevant terms and period labels.
  • Make comparisons between different times in the past.
  • Study different aspects of different people, eg. differences between men and women
  • Examine the causes and results of great events and the impact on people.
  • Compare life in early and late 'times' studied.
  • Compare an aspect of life with the same aspect in another period.
  • Compare accounts of events from different sources - fact or fiction.
  • Offer some reasons for different versions of events.
  • Begin to identify primary and secondary sources.
  • Use evidence to build up a picture of a past event.
  • Select relevant sections of information including library and internet sources.
  • Recall, select and organise historical information to communicate knowledge and understanding.